BREAKING NEWS

BREAKING NEWS

The week that was

PAYING IT FORWARD If anyone knows what it’s like to recover after a devastating flood, it’s students at Minot’s Erik Ramstad Middle School. Some of those students, who have been attending class in temporary classrooms at the Minot Municipal Auditorium since the flood, are working to raise money to help students who were flooded in Colorado. Eighth-graders in Patty Hildenbrand’s advanced English class are organizing a charity dodgeball tournament to be held Nov. 1. Students in another class are organizing a benefit bake sale and a “hat day,” with the proceeds from both events being donated to Colorado flood relief efforts. Ramstad students certainly know the effects of a flood. The old Ramstad was razed following the 2011 Souris River flood. Students are expected to move into a new Ramstad Middle School on North Hill later this year. We applaud the students’ efforts to help others who are experiencing the same sort of devastation as they did two years ago. What a wonderful learning and teaching experience for everyone involved.

CHANGES NECESSARY Unfortunately, spills are bound to happen when the oil industry is booming. But last week’s announcement that 20,600 barrels of oil had leaked from an underground pipeline in northwest North Dakota raises all sorts of questions. Steve Jensen, who owns the land where the spill happened, reported the leak Sept. 29. But it was 12 days before state officials informed the public about the spill, and Gov. Jack Dalrymple said he wasn’t told until this past Wednesday. Needless to say, that’s simply unacceptable. Dalrymple said the state will investigate its procedures for reporting spills. We hope there’s more than simply an investigation. We hope there are changes to the methods, because even if officials initially thought the spill wasn’t large, it should be immediately reported to the public.