Outdoors briefly

Hanson named to advisory board

Governor Jack Dalrymple has appointed Duane Hanson of West Fargo to the North Dakota Game and Fish Department’s advisory board.

The governor appoints eight Game and Fish Department advisors, each representing a multi-county section of the state, to serve as a liaison between the department and public.

Hanson is a financial advisor, West Fargo city commissioner, and avid hunter and angler, and fills the expiring term of Loran Palmer, Wahpeton, in District 5, which includes Cass, Ransom, Richland, Sargent, Steele and Traill counties.

In addition, the governor recently reappointed District 1 advisory board member Jason Leiseth, Arnegard; and District 6 advisory board member Joel Christoferson, Litchville, to another term.

Four members of the advisory board must be farmers or ranchers and four must be hunters/anglers. Appointments are for a term of four years. No member can serve longer than two terms.

CWD surveillance continues

The State Game and Fish Department will continue its Hunter-Harvested Surveillance program during the 2013 hunting season, by sampling deer for chronic wasting disease and bovine tuberculosis from 13 units in North Dakota. In addition, all moose and elk harvested in the state are eligible for testing.

Samples from hunter-harvested deer taken in the eastern portion of the state will be tested from units 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, 2E, 2F1, 2F2, 2G, 2G1, 2G2 and 2L. In addition, deer will be tested from unit 3F2 in the southwest. Every head sampled must have either the deer tag attached, or a new tag can be filled out with the license number, deer hunting unit and date harvested.

In the Minot region, hunters are encouraged to drop off deer heads at the following locations: Bottineau Mattern Family Meats; Cando K&E Meats; Devils Lake Game and Fish Department; Dunseith Wayne’s Food Pride; New Rockford Risovi Taxidermy; Rolette The Meat Shack; and Sheyenne Brenno Meats.

Moose and elk heads should be taken to a Game and Fish office.

CWD affects the nervous system of members of the deer family and is always fatal. Scientists have found no evidence that CWD can be transmitted naturally to humans or livestock.

Baiting of big game prohibited

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department is reminding deer hunters that hunting over bait is prohibited in deer units 3C west of the Missouri River, 3E1, 3E2, 3F1 and 3F2.

Hunting over bait is defined as the placement and/or use of bait(s) for attracting big game and other wildlife to a specific location for the purpose of hunting. Baits include but are not limited to grains, minerals, salts, fruits, vegetables, hay or any other natural or manufactured foods. The designation does not apply to the use of scents and lures, water, food plots, standing crops or livestock feeds used in standard practices.

In addition to the units where hunting over bait is no longer allowed on either private or public land, hunting over bait is also not allowed on most other public land through the state, including state wildlife management areas; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service national wildlife refuges and waterfowl production areas; U.S. Forest Service national grasslands; and all North Dakota state school, state park and state forest service lands.

3F2 transportation requirement

Hunters harvesting a big game animal this fall in North Dakota deer unit 3F2 cannot transport a carcass containing the head and spinal column outside of the unit unless it’s taken directly to a meat processor.

The head can be removed from the carcass and transported outside of the unit if it is to be submitted to a State Game and Fish Department district office, CWD surveillance drop-off location or a licensed taxidermist. If the deer is processed in the field to boned meat, and the hunter wants to leave the head in the field, the head must be legally tagged and the hunter must be able to return to or give the exact location of the head if requested for verification.